Vancouver Mini Maker Faire 2014 Photo Roundup

Thanks to everyone who came out to the 2014 Vancouver Mini Maker Faire! For those of you who missed it, here’s a little round up of some of what was happening this year. We’re planning the 2015 show already – if you’d like to receive information about volunteering with us or being a Maker next year, sign up for our newsletter.

Photo Credit Steven Smethurst

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Steven Smethurst

Photo Credit Steven Smethurst

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Steven Smethurst

Photo Credit Steven Smethurst

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Steven Smethurst

Photo Credit Steven Smethurst

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Emily Smith

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Matt LeBlanc

Photo Credit Steven Smethurst

Photo Credit Steven Smethurst

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Thanks to all of our performers, speakers, teachers, volunteers, and Makers for putting together an amazing show this year! If you can’t wait until 2015 for more Making, follow us on Facebook and Twitter to keep up with what’s going on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 







Vancouver Shares

Robots, lifehacks, crafty design – there’s plenty to stumble upon at the Mini Maker Faire. This weekend, we host one of the most engaging and unique events in Vancouver to share our ideas and ingenuity with our community. Thanks to our friends at Modo, we know this is part of building a healthy, connected city.

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Many of our Makers know Modo quite well. They use Modo vehicles to transport their inventions, run errands for supplies, or just get around town when transit or bikes won’t cut it. It’s not uncommon to see a multitude of Modos parked outside the venue for VMMF weekend – and it’s growing each year.

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As part of our Community Partnership with Modo – VMMF’s Official Transportation Sponsor this year! – we’ve invited them to join us with their Make It Happen booth! Sponsored by Vancity, and in partnership with Share Vancouver, this booth is your one-stop shop for all things #SharingEconomy. Do you have a dream project that seems out of reach? Chat with their experts to learn about shared resources and sharing initiatives available in the city that can make your dream a reality! Make, Move, Finance and Share – it’s taking the Modo co-operative to the next level.

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As an added bonus, VMMF attendees get a special Modo promotion with their ticket stub: 1-month FREE trial membership + $40 carsharing credit. So if you’ve been thinking about carsharing, join up with Modo this weekend! They’ll also be doing on-site registration at their Make It Happen Booth, making it even more convenient.

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Thanks for the support, Modo – see you at the Faire!

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The Hardest Working Makers This Weekend Will Be…

Just one more sleep until the 2014 Vancouver Mini Maker Faire! We’re so excited, and hope you are, too!

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There are so many crazy and exciting things to dazzle Faire attendees that sometimes our most hard-working Makers go unappreciated – nearly unnoticed, sometimes, even. Nonetheless, they keep coming back year after year, and the Faire wouldn’t be the same without them. They each add something tangible to the flavour of the Faire, and they work hard all weekend long to make sure the rest of us -attendees and VMMF staff alike- have the most enjoyable weekend possible. You know who I’m talking about, right? Yes – our food vendors!

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The 2014 VMMF sees the return of the food trucks who have supported us every year since we started, and some new ones, too!

varinicey-pakorasVarinicey (pronounce it VERY NICE ee) Pakoras is back, of course – the show wouldn’t be the same without them!  Their pakoras are vegan, gluten free, and delicious, making it easy to feed just about anybody.

taser-grilled-cheeseTaser Grilled Cheese is back to serve up the best gourmet grilled cheese in town!

serious-sausageAnother VMMF regular, Serious Sausage will serve up some… well, some serious sausage. 

Ze-BiteZe Bite will be at the show serving up their fantastic sandwiches (served on a baguette or a gluten-free crepe); if you’ve got a sweet tooth, their selection of sweet crepes is also sure to delight!

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Treat yourself to a tasty snack that’s sweet, salty and oh-so healthy! Cup-A-Corn’s got six flavours to choose from, including Wasabi Ginger, Thai, Peanut Satay, Indian, Cinnamon Dessert and Classic (with lemon, salt, and pepper).

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Johnny’s Pops sells handmade artisan popsicles out of an old-school bicycle-mounted cooler.

On-the-grindOn The Grind uses both pedal and solar power to bring you the finest grinds and tastiest treats!

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Look for our awesome food vendors in the outdoor area of the Faire, on the west side of the building.

 

 

 

 







Check Out the VMMF 2014 Silent Auction!

Our Makers are a generous bunch! Vancouver Mini Maker Faire is hosting a silent auction this year to raise funds for the Faire and for The Vancouver Maker Foundation, the umbrella organization that puts on the Faire every year, and our exhibitors have donated some truly stellar items for attendees to bid on.

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Two of our returning Makers have donated seats to a couple of awesome classes: Laser Cutter Cafe is offering up two spots in their “Introduction to Laser Cutting” class, and DIY or Die!!! has two seats to their “Painting With Wool” workshop up for grabs.

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If making things at home from a kit is more your style, then check out the Mini Electric Guitar kit from IoT Design Shop. The strings on this 320mm guitar can be installed and tuned the same way as a normal sized guitar. The built-in amp and speaker output a powerful distortion sound, and an external amp can also be connected with a standard 1/4″ jack for clearer & better tones. The kit even includes a pick that allows for easy playing! All that’s needed to assemble this kit is a Phillips screwdriver, everyday cellophane tape, pliers, and 2xAA batteries.

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Make your own movies at home with the Tabletop Moviemaking Studio! This kit even comes a 3 Point LED lighting system with color gels.

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Put on your sea legs with this nautical themed jewelry set from Parrotphernalia. The earrings are made with tibetan silver anchors displaying your LOVE for the sea with recycled Blue Macaw feathers; the pendant is made from a cut sea shell, with two colours of recycled Blue Macaw feathers.

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The BCIT Technology Teacher Education group is giving us not one, but TWO mini-sumo robots to auction off! The mini-sumo robot is a small, Arduino-controlled vehicle typical of what a Technology Teacher might assign to their students in a Grade 11 or 12 high school electronics class. It can be controlled from an Android phone, or even from a TV Remote Control unit. Alternatively it can use its on-board sensors for autonomous operation, following lines, or actively avoiding objects. This package includes an Arduino Uno, custom control shield, Tamiya gear box and sensors all mounted in a 3D-printed chassis. With all the construction and wiring done, and with the Bluetooth code pre-installed, all you need to do is throw the switch and start driving. Even the batteries are included!

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Strathcona 1890 Urban Seed Collection is providing us with one of their “Zombie Apocalypse Survival Seeds” packages. This collection contains everything you need to grow to survive a zombie apocalypse (or robot uprising, perhaps?) .

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Zaber Technologies has put together an awesome package that includes a digital micrometer, digital multimeter, caliper, screwdriver set, tape measure, and two t-shirts.

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We’ve got an amazing  13″ x 19″ art print of “the meowl” from PHRESHA.

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This earring from Side B Design Studio’s DRIFT collection features a hand painted and printed horn-shaped textile piece and black leather that hang from some chain. Inspired by tribal and primitive design, this solo earring makes a statement at a length of 6 inches.

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The BC Meccano Club is offering a Meccano Super Construction Set. Designed for ages 10+, this system of small parts combine in numerous ways to create an infinite number of models. The Meccano Super Construction Set comes with a handy, compartmentalized carrying case and plans for 25 different models. The kid includes over 640 parts and a 6-volt battery-powered motor. It can be combined with other Meccano sets to make even more models.

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Vancouver Mini Maker Faire regular John Biehler of 3D604.org is providing two books, both signed by the authors: “3D Printing for Autodesk” by John Biehler and Bill Fane and “Getting Started with Raspberry Pi” by Matt Richardson and Shawn Wallace.

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That’s not all! Make sure you stop by the silent auction table to check out the other auction items, including home-baked all-butter cookies, posters, gear sets, a handblown glass mug, and more! Proceeds from the silent auction are used to fuel Vancouver Maker Foundation events and initiatives. Vancouver Maker Foundation has brought together a broad range of Vancouver artists, hobbyists, creatives, collectives, and small businesses through projects like Maker Music, the Young Makers Program, the Vancouver Maker Education Meet-up Group. Their driving purpose is to continue to connect like-minded tinkerers in order to cross-pollinate ideas, share resources, and inspire one another in exploring passion projects, hobbies, businesses, or achieving a unique feat.

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Meet Your Maker: IoT Design Shop

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Vancouver-based IoT Design Shop is a leader in the development of Internet of Things (IoT)-related technology. They’re dedicated to bringing a number of solutions to market in 2014, including Bluetooth Low Energy devices, proximity systems, and wearables. Their products are designed, manufactured, and assembled in their office, right here in the Lower Mainland. They’re bringing their ConnectionMaker indoor location system to Vancouver Mini Maker Faire for attendees to try out; fairgoers will be able to download the ConnectionMaker app from the app store and then use it to locate and identify other people who are using the app. Fun!

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What are you making/exhibiting at VMMF this year?

This year we are exhibiting ConnectionMaker, a state-of-the-art indoor positioning system that brings the power and convenience of GPS to micro indoor locations. It’s basically an indoor location-based social network that makes it easy for people to meet with one another at events or conferences. Using the ConnectionMaker app on your smartphones, you will be able to see the location and contact information of other Makers at the Faire. ConnectionMaker is revolutionizing how people meet at events and the underlying technology will pave the way for indoor location-based services that will change the way people do business.

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What else do you make?

We are excited to be launching the beta version of our new consumer product at VMMF this year! It is a system that bridges your digital and physical worlds by combining the location-detection abilities of our beacons with a mobile app. Basically you can configure your smartphone to take predetermined actions when you encounter beacons in the world. These actions, or really reactions, include:

 

  • launching an app

  • displaying a message on your phone

  • playing a sound

  • opening a URL

  • starting a text or email message

  • starting a tweet or Facebook post

  • starting a phone call

 

So how do we use it? Our favourite ways are to launch iTunes as we approach our cars and to play a sound to announce our arrivals at the office! Stop by our booth at the event to see the product in action.

 

We have also developed a proprietary platform called IoT Core. It is basically a toolkit that can be used to rapidly develop connected-product ecosystems. The components include mobile apps, Bluetooth Low Energy devices and a cloud back end. IoT Core is what we have used internally to build our new consumer product, ConnectionMaker and Bluetooth Low Energy Beacons with iBeacon Technology (BLE Beacons). We see IoT core being a key bridge between Makers and smartphone control of their creations.

 

Our BLE Beacons create small, concentrated areas of detection where a user’s proximity to a known location can be determined. This opens the door for many promotional, analytical and convenience applications that have not been possible until now. The basic idea is that business can increase revenue by sending targeted messages to their customers upon entry to a zone or store.

 

For Makers we currently sell a Beacon Development Kit with iBeacon Technology that includes custom firmware and a sample iOS application. This is available for purchase through our website and will also be available at our booth at VMMF. We engage directly with companies that are looking to roll out large numbers of beacons or even customized devices.

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What is your favourite part about being a Maker? Your least favourite part? The most challenging part?

Without question the our favourite part about being Makers is seeing our ideas come to life. There is nothing quite as satisfying as seeing the proverbial “Hello world!” message when you flip the power switch or run an app for the first time. Our favourite-favourite part is then refining our ideas to make commercially-viable products so we can create revenue for our company. Our least favourite part is hunting down well hidden bugs, which can also be the most challenging part. But without challenges to overcome, and the headaches that come along with them, Makers would not get the same satisfaction out of their creations!

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How else does the passion for making manifest in your life? Where does it come from?

Making is really a state of mind. Once you’re there, good luck keeping it from permeating the other areas of your life. An example of this is spending all day trying to optimize a solution in the office. When you go home and make tacos for dinner, I bet they won’t end up being the base solution of ground beef, salt, and tortillas. Those babies will be optimized with cilantro, spices, guacamole, salsa and of course mucho queso!

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Have you been a maker your whole life? What’s your earliest memory of making ?

 

Yes we have! Some of our earliest memories of Making include ‘playing’ with Duplo. Looking back on this now we all agree that we were in fact developing job skills that we’ve since applied in our careers in the tech industry. Another memory that often pops up is that of taking things apart to see how they work. I have to admit that I struggle not to take my toaster apart on a daily basis… I know how it works, but maybe this one is something different than the 10+ I set my parents’ kitchen on fire with when I was 7. Those were bad years for household appliances!

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Who’s your favourite Maker? Other than yourself.

Nikola Tesla is my favourite Maker of all time hands down. Not only were his ideas huge and crazy, he was a genius and actually turned his waaaay-out-there concepts into super useful technology!

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Who or what inspires you to keep on making, even when your project falls to pieces?

It’s hard to explain, but we all feel the same deep-seated duty to build things. It’s almost a primal instinct to create. So really, it would be a challenge to stop making rather than to find the inspiration to continue. Save us from ourselves!

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What is it about Maker Faire It that attracts you as an exhibitor? What are you looking forward to the most?

As Makers we love to connect with community to see what our peers are up to. We never cease to be blown away by what our fellow Makers dream up and the quality and complexity of their projects.

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Your company is a VMMF 2014 Sponsor. What is it about the Faire that draws your organization?

Making is at the heart of what we do. It’s all about identifying a need and then finding a creative way to apply technology to address it. For us it’s paramount to support other creative people, regardless of what their medium is, and to help them show the world what they’ve done!

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Don’t miss the presentation that IoT Design Shop’s Trent Shumay is giving as part of the 2014 VMMF Speaker Series! He’ll be telling us about how they used 3D printing technology to quadruple their manufacturing capacity, and how it allowed them to test markets, pivot, and deliver production-quality units to customers around the world. And make sure you stop by the VMMF silent auction to place a bid on their awesome donation – a Mini Electric Guitar Kit! For more information and to keep up with what IoT Design Shop is up to, check their website or follow them on twitter.

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Guest Blogger, Laura Bucci: Stitching With Purpose

I was aware of the craftivist movement for at least a couple of years before I took action with my own project, “The Minimum Wage.” It all started a few years ago, after I closed my small business and started looking for work in the arts, and eventually beyond the arts. Employers wanted my educational credentials and work experience in exchange for only $10.25 per hour—the current minimum wage in BC (the living wage in Metro Vancouver in 2014 is $20.10 per hour). It is impossible to live a healthy and balanced lifestyle in Vancouver when earning the minimum wage.

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While this was frustrating for me, it also got me thinking of the struggle that others in more challenging situations experience: single parents, students, seniors, persons with disabilities, even two parents earning the minimum wage. I decided that the best way I could add my voice to the issue was by crafting messages and putting them out there for people to think about. I use yarn to cross-stitch short phrases onto large wire mesh panels and hang them on city fences around my neighbourhood. I envisioned people glancing at my messages while walking to work and back and starting a conversation in their head about their own situation and forming questions about the issue. You never know who is going to be looking at your work; it could an employer, a policy maker, a minimum wage worker, a child. Using craft to communicate an idea, a feeling, or your view on issues is what craftivism is all about. Craftivism offers an alternative way of contributing your voice to issues you care about. When you decide to take action, you increase your involvement in an issue with body and mind. The mere act of working on the project propels you into further thought on the issue.

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While there are other types of craftivism, the one I practice at the moment is text-based and comments on a social issue I care about. The workshop I’ll be leading at Vancouver Mini Maker Faire focuses on this type of craftivism. I’ll lead you through a brainstorming session, and then you’ll learn how to cross-stitch your message on fabric (see image below), so that you, too, can add your voice to issues you care about. And if you’re not feeling political, that’s OK, you can express any sentiment you like. Stitch it and share it with your neighbourhood.

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The Stitching with Purpose workshop happens June 8th at Vancouver Mini Maker Faire. All materials provided; please pre-register here.

 


About the Author:

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Laura Bucci is an artist whose work includes an ongoing project in craftivism as well as investigations in the practice of art journaling. Her craftivist project has been seen in her Grandview-Woodland neighbourhood and explores facts and feelings about the minimum wage/living wage. Laura believes that creativity is an important part of everyone’s lives and to this end she has taught workshops for non-artists as well as having organized a mail art exhibition (2013) that was open to anyone at any age. She recently presented at Pecha Kucha Richmond. See more of her work at www.laurabucci.com.

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Meet Your Maker: Sophia Kreuzkamp of Parrotphernalia – Five Reasons Great Jewelry Comes From Happy, Healthy Birds

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We’re excited to host Sophia Kreuzkamp of Parrotphernalia in our Maker Faire Marketplace this year. We were so intrigued by her process and her products that we asked her to tell us a little bit about herself, and how she ended up working with a medium as unusual as bird feathers. Here’s what she told us:

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My story begins with my Blue-fronted Amazon, Larry. While he can sometimes be a grump or a little wary around new people, Larry is actually very sweet once you get to know him. I think Larry and his parrot-brethren are some of the most beautiful animals on the planet. They come in all shapes and sizes, and in pretty much every colour imaginable. As is natural for birds, Larry loses his feathers (or molts) twice a year around winter and summer. During one of these molting periods, I realized that Larry’s feathers, too beautiful to be thrown away, deserved to be appreciated as the works of art that they are.

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And thus, Parrotphernalia was born!

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Here are the top five reasons we love what we do:

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1. Our products are from happy, healthy birds.

Most (if not all) feathered jewelry and accessories bought in stores use feathers plucked straight from the bird while they’re still alive. All Parrotphernalia products are made solely with ethically-sourced feathers no longer needed by happy, healthy birds living in sanctuaries across Canada or as someone’s companion.

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2. Our products are from natural breed birds.

Feathered products bought in stores often come from birds that were bred specifically for the production of these items. Feathered hair extensions are a common example – these come from specially bred roosters created to produce a special kind of tail feather. These roosters live in a factory environment solely to produce feathers for consumers. Our products, on the other hand, come from birds who enjoy freedom of movement and healthy interaction with humans.

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3. No dyes or harmful chemicals are used to create our products.

Many feather products bought in stores have been treated with harmful chemicals before being imported. In most cases, these feathers have also been dyed, which imparts an unnatural hue. Not only are these processes environmentally unfriendly, they diminish the final feathered product’s longevity. Compared to our ethically-sourced feathers, commercial feathers have a very short life-span. Because we know our feathers come from healthy birds, and they are not imported, we are able to use a simple cleaning solution which doesn’t affect the colour or longevity of the feathers.

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4. We give what we get!

In return for each feather donation we receive, we make the contributors an exclusive piece from their donation as a way of thanking those that help us bring our products to the world. Additionally, we provide products for our partner sanctuaries’ fundraising events.

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5. If we can upcycle bird feathers, you can upcycle something fabulous too!

From our business we hope to inspire others to upcycle and recycle everyday things to create something fabulous. Every little act of creativity, whether by us or you, helps our environment and our feathered friends!

 

Look for the Parrotphernalia booth in our Maker Faire Marketplace, or check them out online on their website, on facebook, or (fittingly) on twitter.

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Bring Your E-Waste to the Faire for Free Recycling!

Is there an old Atari in your attic? A Commodore 64 in your closet? The Hackery will be at Vancouver Mini Maker Faire to take your unwanted computers and components! There’s no charge for recycling, and no limit to how old or broken the components can be. In fact, there’s room on their museum wall for a few more historical artifacts. Bring all your odds-and-ends of electronics, cables, phones, and what-nots to the Faire and The Hackery will make sure that they will be either reused or responsibly recycled.
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They can accept anything computer-related for recycling, whether it’s in working order or not:

  • Computers – complete or in parts
  • Laptops – complete or in parts
  • LCD’s – Computer or TV
  • Motherboards and accessory cards
  • Computer cables, wires
  • Keyboards and mice
  • Network equipment
  • Printers and scanners
  • Game consoles
  • Cell phones
  • UPS – Uninterruptible Power Supplies
  • Home electronics(Stereos, DVD players, etc)
  • Rechargeable batteries
  • CRT Monitors
  • CD & DVDs
Donated computers will have their hard drives wiped or crushed to keep data away from prying eyes.
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They can’t accept:
  • Tube TV’s
  • Kitchen appliances (microwaves, coffee machines, etc.)
  • Toner or ink cartridges
  • Photocopiers
  • Smoke detectors
  • PCB containing light ballasts

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E-waste recycling will be available all weekend, next to the VMMF information booth outside of the entry. Send your friends too! Cool things happen to people who recycle.

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The Hackery has been repairing and recycling computers since 2008. They’re a local company offering a local solution to the global e-waste problem, specializing in component-level repairs that other shops turn away. And for gear that’s ready to retire, they ensure that every part is recycled ethically – and free of charge.

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Make sure you catch The Hackery’s exhibit at the Faire - the majority of what they make are repairs, which are often tucked away inside of a device where no one can see them, so this year they’re turning things inside out! Their exhibit, Behind the Screens, shows the inner workings of common devices, from cell phones to Playstations, laid bare for all to see. Staples from our modern world have been saved from recycling, repaired in their shop, then carefully cut open in such a way to preserve functionality. You can finally see what makes your laptop tick or your TV light up!

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Come down and try your hand at playing Pac-man on half a TV. See if you can still use a cell phone when the parts aren’t where you expect. And most of all, get a glimpse of the world hiding right beneath the surface of our daily lives.

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For more information on how to recycle your e-waste at The Hackery year-round, check their website, or follow them on Twitter and Facebook.

 

 







Meet Your Maker: Jessi Langager and Joshua Langager

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Young Makers Jessi Langager (15) and Joshua Langager (13) are two of our most popular Makers, and they’re returning this year with a new project! We can hardly wait to welcome them back.

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What are you bringing to Vancouver Mini Maker Faire this year?

We will be doing demos of our NXT robot which is a buildable and programmable robot.  We will showcase how it gets programmed on the laptop, showing how it moves and turns, and fun things you can build and program with it.

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What is your favourite part about being an exhibitor at the show? 

We get to teach kids about robotics and we loved the “like stickys” last year, all the awesome displays- 3D printers, the Titanaboa robot……The toughest part was leaving and waiting another year to come back.

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How else does the passion for making manifest in your life? Where does it come from?

We have always being very creative; we love to build things. Our mom finds competitions, events, fun programs for us and dad has trained and pushed us to practice everyday our robotics so this year he helped us get a gold medal.  He has been our robotics coach.

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You’re among the youngest Makers at the show this year – what’s that like?

We love the attention and we can teach kids better because we are kids.

langager-2Have you been a maker your whole life? What’s your earliest memory of making ?

We both love drawing Pokémon, Mario kart, and playing minecraft- creating lots of worlds.  Joshua started composing his own songs at 18 months old about his favourite toys.

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Who’s your favourite Maker? Other than yourself.

Titanoboa is the most fun coolest robotic snake we have ever seen!!!

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Who or what inspires you to keep on making, even when your project falls to pieces?

Our dad pushed us to  practice a lot and it can be frustrating when a program doesn’t work properly but we stop and try again- we have learned to get along better, to not argue or get mad at each other, we make a really focused and relaxed team and our mom got a ton of complements from the judges of the competition this year, she was so proud.

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What is it about Maker Faire It that attracts you as an exhibitor? What are you looking forward to the most?

It’s fun being there showing off our talents as programmers and it’s so much fun to look around at  all our neighbours and all the cool things they’re doing.

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Don’t miss the Langager booth at Vancouver Mini Maker Faire this year! You’ll find them in the tech zone at the north end of the Forum.







Guest Blogger, Jessica Glesby: Challenging Stereotypes Through Graffiti Knitting

The recent and relatively unknown contemporary art form of graffiti knitting is the act of installing yarn-based products in a public space in ways that may gently provoke sociopolitical and cultural dialogue.
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What happens when male and female teenagers are taught how to yarn bomb as part of their high school arts curriculum? This was my qualitative research as a graduate student at Boston University.
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Students each designed their own graffiti knitting installations, and were required to write artist statements. Classroom discussions blossomed while students knit. Topics included self-reliance, consumerism, graffiti and knitting sterotypes, gender roles, community, installations, the history of knitting and graffiti, empowerment, and the perception of the role and value of craft art in society.
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I look forward to further explaining my research as well as my findings at the Vancouver Mini Maker Faire Speaker Series on June 8th at 2:00 pm. Bring your questions!
You can also find me at womanundone.com.

About the Author:

Jessica-Glesby

 

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Jessica Glesby is an artist educator who works to make cold spaces warm by producing and strengthening communities and empowering individuals. Her artworks build on the experiential knowledge of participants and facilitate discussion through collaborative craft. Jessica has a Bachelor of Media Arts from Emily Carr University, a Bachelor of Education from the University of British Columbia and a Masters of Art in Art Education from Boston University. She currently works as a freelance community artist while teaching high school for the Vancouver School Board. Say hello and discover more at womanundone.com

Photo Credit – Michaela Garstin

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